CR 71 – My top 5 books of 2015

My top five books read in the last year in no particular order. Please share your top books of the year.

Each book shares the common link of seeking to find a way to communicate to an audience through understanding and empathy.
From kings to kids and everything in-between.

top_5_books_2015

Hitchcock: A Definitive Study of Alfred Hitchcock by Francois Truffaut

“The art of creating suspense is also the art of involving the audience, so that the viewer is actually a participant in the film” – Alfred Hitchcock


Wolf Hall:
A Novel by Hilary Mantel

“He thinks, Gregory is all he should be. He is everything I have a right to hope for: his openness, his gentleness, the reserve and consideration with which he holds back his thoughts till he has framed them. He feels such tenderness for him he thinks he might cry”


The 42nd Parallel
(U.S.A. Trilogy Book 1) by John Dos Passos

‘I want to rise with the ranks, not from the ranks,’” said Mac.


Nonviolent Communication
 by Marshall B. Rosenberg, Arun Gandhi

“Classifying and judging people promotes violence”
“When we are in contact with our feelings and needs, we humans no longer make good slaves and underlings.”
“Expressing our vulnerability can help resolve conflicts.”
“Depression is the reward we get for being “good.”


Unconditional Parenting
 by Alfie Kohn

“Over many years, researchers have found that “the more conditional the support [one receives], the lower one’s perceptions of overall worth as a person.”

“People who, as a rule, don’t think their value hinges on their performance are more likely to see failure as just a temporary setback, a problem to be solved. They also seem less likely to be anxious or depressed.”

“My friend Danny recently summarized what he’s learned from years of fatherhood: “Being right isn’t necessarily what matters.”

Express your need

Express your need
Occupy Wall Street March – October 5, 2011 – NYC

For the last few years I have been fascinated by the idea of personal culture. How people spend their time, how they create their ideas and content and how they represent themselves to a wider world.

My fascination centers on the idea that understanding yourself better helps you ground yourself; by understanding your own needs you become more empathic towards those of others. By doing this, you become less afraid, more courageous and hopeful.

Representing yourself to the world is a tricky business, you have to show your past, present and future, and much of it centers on how you express what you need. Not what you think or what you want but what you need as a person to grow and better understand yourself.

This has led me on a path of researching how people can express what they need. Two books I have found stand out as examples of this idea.

Nonviolent communication by Marshal Rosenberg and Unconditional parenting by Alphie Kohn. While these books on the surface seem to be dealing with very different subject matters they share a core idea of helping people express what they need and creating a vocabulary which is rarely taught. I hope you find the following set of quotes from these books as enlightening and as empowering as I did.

 

Empathy

“Former United Nations Secretary-General Dag Hammarskjold once said, “The more faithfully you listen to the voice within you, the better you will hear what is happening outside.” – Marshal Rosenberg

“To focus on children’s needs, and to work with them to make sure their needs are met, constitutes a commitment to taking children seriously. It means treating them as people whose feelings and desires and questions matter.”- Alphie Kohn

“I’ve become convinced that praise is less a function of what kids need to hear than of what we need to say.”- Alphie Kohn

“When we are in contact with our feelings and needs, we humans no longer make good slaves and underlings.”- Marshal Rosenberg

Stating your needs

“There is a story of a man on all fours under a street lamp, searching for something. A policeman passing by asked what he was doing. “Looking for my car keys,” replied the man, who appeared slightly drunk. “Did you drop them here?” inquired the officer. “No,” answered the man, “I dropped them in the alley.” Seeing the policeman’s baffled expression, the man hastened to explain, “But the light is much better here.”- Marshal Rosenberg

“A bit of background may be appropriate here. In our culture’s workplaces, classrooms, and families, there are two basic strategies by which people with more power try to get people with less power to obey. One way is to punish noncompliance. The other is to reward compliance.”- Marshal Rosenberg

“Depression is the reward we get for being “good.”- Marshal Rosenberg

“The most dangerous of all behaviors may consist of doing things “because we’re supposed to.”- Marshal Rosenberg

Communication

“My friend Danny recently summarized what he’s learned from years of fatherhood: “Being right isn’t necessarily what matters.” – Alphie Kohn

“Studies in labor-management negotiations demonstrate that the time required to reach conflict resolution is cut in half when each negotiator agrees, before responding, to accurately repeat what the previous speaker had said.”- Marshal Rosenberg

“Listen to what people are needing rather what they are thinking.”- Marshal Rosenberg

“When we listen for feelings and needs, we no longer see people as monsters.”- Marshal Rosenberg

Sharing

“Expressing our vulnerability can help resolve conflicts”- Marshal Rosenberg

“If we express our needs, we have a better chance of getting them met.”- Marshal Rosenberg

“After all, if we want a child to grow into a genuinely compassionate person, then it’s not enough to know whether he just did something helpful. We’d want to know why” – Alphie Kohn

The promise of technology

Now thats what I call seamless technology

The promise of technology was that it would deliver people form the tedium of manual work. Robots would do all the jobs that we do not or would not do and that people would be free to pursue ideas and dreams of a higher order.

So why today in 2013 are people in China and most of South East Asia making all of the goods that were meant to be made by robots?

Here are some articles / videos which go some way to explaining where the tech utopia went and how it is effecting us as people. – KP

All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace

“A series of films about how humans have been colonized by the machines they have built. Although we don’t realize it, the way we see everything in the world today is through the eyes of the computers. It claims that computers have failed to liberate us and instead have distorted and simplified our view of the world around us.”

Adam curtis documentary 

Source : topdocumentaryfilms 

The Army of Technological Slaves

“That is Benedikt’s call, cited above: take advantage of the machines, they are made for this! And that means: also creative professionals, mind workers, editors, journalists, should think like hackers. Hacker for me is a neutral to positive term. Hacker make use of technology as completely as possible. Like the famous investigative journalists, they don’t let themselves hold up by arbitrary rules which are supposed to tell us, how we should use information.”

Read more

Source : Slow media

Tech And toddlers

“She recently carried out a study to see if the ways mothers interacted with their toddlers differed depending on whether they were playing with more traditional toys –a shape sorter, a book, a toy animal – or battery-powered equivalents. She found that with the electronic toys, “Parents were not less affectionate, but they were less responsive, less encouraging and did far less teaching. It was almost like the toy was interfering.”

Read more

Source : Guardian

You think you are a consumer but maybe you have been consumed

“One of the guiding beliefs of our consuming age is that we are all free and independent individuals. That we can choose to do pretty much what we want, and if we can’t then it’s bad.”

Adam Curtis documentary 

Source :Adam Curtis