CR 71 – My top 5 books of 2015

My top five books read in the last year in no particular order. Please share your top books of the year.

Each book shares the common link of seeking to find a way to communicate to an audience through understanding and empathy.
From kings to kids and everything in-between.

top_5_books_2015

Hitchcock: A Definitive Study of Alfred Hitchcock by Francois Truffaut

“The art of creating suspense is also the art of involving the audience, so that the viewer is actually a participant in the film” – Alfred Hitchcock


Wolf Hall:
A Novel by Hilary Mantel

“He thinks, Gregory is all he should be. He is everything I have a right to hope for: his openness, his gentleness, the reserve and consideration with which he holds back his thoughts till he has framed them. He feels such tenderness for him he thinks he might cry”


The 42nd Parallel
(U.S.A. Trilogy Book 1) by John Dos Passos

‘I want to rise with the ranks, not from the ranks,’” said Mac.


Nonviolent Communication
 by Marshall B. Rosenberg, Arun Gandhi

“Classifying and judging people promotes violence”
“When we are in contact with our feelings and needs, we humans no longer make good slaves and underlings.”
“Expressing our vulnerability can help resolve conflicts.”
“Depression is the reward we get for being “good.”


Unconditional Parenting
 by Alfie Kohn

“Over many years, researchers have found that “the more conditional the support [one receives], the lower one’s perceptions of overall worth as a person.”

“People who, as a rule, don’t think their value hinges on their performance are more likely to see failure as just a temporary setback, a problem to be solved. They also seem less likely to be anxious or depressed.”

“My friend Danny recently summarized what he’s learned from years of fatherhood: “Being right isn’t necessarily what matters.”

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CR 68 – My top 5 books of 2014

My top five books read in the last year in no particular order. Please share your top books of the year.

top_5_books_2014

 

How numbers rule the world by Lorenzo Fioramonti

Statistics are, by definition, static: ‘Things have to keep static if you’re going to count them’, argues David Boyle, fellow at the New Economics Foundation and author of The Tyranny of Numbers: ‘But real life isn’t still.’

 

A Man’s Head by Georges Simenon

The Time machine  by George Orwell

“Simple was my explanation, and plausible enough—as most wrong theories are!”

 

What I believe by Bertrand Russell

“The good life is one inspired by love and guided by knowledge.”

 

The Long Goodbye by Raymond Chandler

“There are places where cops are not hated, Captain. But in those places you wouldn’t be a cop.”

The promise of technology

Now thats what I call seamless technology

The promise of technology was that it would deliver people form the tedium of manual work. Robots would do all the jobs that we do not or would not do and that people would be free to pursue ideas and dreams of a higher order.

So why today in 2013 are people in China and most of South East Asia making all of the goods that were meant to be made by robots?

Here are some articles / videos which go some way to explaining where the tech utopia went and how it is effecting us as people. – KP

All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace

“A series of films about how humans have been colonized by the machines they have built. Although we don’t realize it, the way we see everything in the world today is through the eyes of the computers. It claims that computers have failed to liberate us and instead have distorted and simplified our view of the world around us.”

Adam curtis documentary 

Source : topdocumentaryfilms 

When Will this Low-Innovation Internet Era End?

“Then there’s another view, which I heard from author Neal Stephenson in an MIT lecture hall last week. A hundred years from now, he said, we might look back on the late 20th and early 21st century and say, “It was an actively creative society. Then the Internet happened and everything got put on hold for a generation.”

Read more

Source : HBR

Tech And toddlers

“She recently carried out a study to see if the ways mothers interacted with their toddlers differed depending on whether they were playing with more traditional toys –a shape sorter, a book, a toy animal – or battery-powered equivalents. She found that with the electronic toys, “Parents were not less affectionate, but they were less responsive, less encouraging and did far less teaching. It was almost like the toy was interfering.”

Read more

Source : Guardian

You think you are a consumer but maybe you have been consumed

“One of the guiding beliefs of our consuming age is that we are all free and independent individuals. That we can choose to do pretty much what we want, and if we can’t then it’s bad.”

Adam Curtis documentary 

Source :Adam Curtis